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Mumia Abu-Jamal's Radio Essays

Commentaries by the award-winning journalist and activist Mumia Abu-Jamal
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Mumia Abu-Jamal's Radio Essays
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Now displaying: Page 1
Mar 4, 2007
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3 Comments
  • six and a half years ago
    charms thomas sabo
    Color-Typen ab dem Buchstaben charms thomas sabo D und geht dann den ganzen thomas sabo charm Weg bis zum Ende des Alphabets thomas sabo anhänger so wahr und farblose Diamanten sind thomas sabo anhaenger abgestufte D. Sie sind die ketten von thomas sabo seltenste aller thomas sabo kette Diamanten betrachtet, sondern es gibt auch thomas sabo ketten farbige Diamanten, die meisten wegen ihrer thomas sabo armbänder Seltenheit geschätzt werden . Cut ist armbänder thomas sabo ebenfalls ein bedeutender Charakter der thomas sabo armband Diamant-Schmuck, weil der Glanz und Brillanz wird thomas sabo uhr seine Schnitt ab. Eine perfekte und kreative Schnitt ermöglicht Licht zu betreten und zu reflektieren uhren thomas sabo durch den Diamanten und geben ihm einen perfekten Glanz.
  • over ten years ago
    TjuhuTiy Adjeiwa
    (revision)
    \"Why don\'t you try to talk to (-male student with fair complexion\'s name here-)?\"
    \"He don\'t want no \'chocolate\' shake!\"
    It was the new millennium when, pending a contract as a math teacher at a charter school in Stone Mountain Georgia, I overheard these comments among some 8th grade sisters who were certified \"knock outs\". The one in reference, a beautiful brown-skinned girl, was my teacher aide, so I knew her to be a stellar student.
    At former assignments, I would have been at liberty to tell that sister about her ability to get any man she chose. But, here, I didn\'t yet know the students or trust my new administration not to chastise me for interfering in those students “personal issues?. In my earlier career as a teacher for more years than I care to count, I did this with ease. I taught Afrakan history in my English classes, requiring essays on it, using the seven Kwanzaa principals to teach outline and writing. We started the first wave of \"Black Reading Month\" with a brother named Malik Yakini in the Detroit Public Schools. That was when teachers had autonomy in the classroom. That was when teaching was effective. That was when the parents of my students were my high school class mates. I had been their first female senior class president; my predecessor, the first Afrakan ascendant. Educators, administrators, parents, students all respected things like that. We all were unified in getting our students through the educational system, even with its problems. I attended public school, so my students were ordinary with average incomes just like me. My parents were teachers in the same school system. So were most of my relatives. My father and mother graduates of HBCU\'s gave me an option to go to a non-HBCU and I took it. I graduated summa cum laude from the University of Michigan.
    By the time I got my Master\'s degree in administrative education, things had changed severely. No longer could an educator speak to a student about behavior problems. You never
  • over ten years ago
    TjuhuTiy Adjeiwa
    \"Why don\'t you try to talk to (the male student with fair complexion\'s name here)?\"
    \"He don\'t want no \'chocolate\' shake!\"
    It was 2002 when a new teacher, pending a contract as a math teacher at a charter school in Stone Mountain Georgia, I overheard these comments among some 8th grade sisters who were certified \"knock outs\". The one in reference, a beautiful brown-skinned girl, was my teacher aide, so I knew her to be a stellar student.
    At former assignments, I would have been at liberty to tell that sister about her ability to get any man she chose. But, here, I didn\'t yet know the students or trust my new administration not to chastise me for interfering in those students personal issues. In my earlier career as a teacher for more years than I care to count, I did this with ease. I taught Afrakan history in my English classes, requiring essays on it, using the seven Kwanzaa principals to teach outline and writing. We started the first wave of \"Black Reading Month\" with a brother named Malik Yakini in the Detroit Public Schools. That was when teachers had autonomy in the classroom. That was when teaching was affective. That was when the parents of my students were my high school class mates. I had been their first female senior class president; my predecessor, the first Afrakan ascendant. Educators, administrators, parents, students all respected things like that. We all were unified in getting our students through the educational system, even with its problems. I attended public school, so my students were ordinary with average incomes just like me. My parents were teachers in the same school system. So were most of my relatives. My father and mother graduates of HBCU\'s gave me an option to go to a non-HBCU and I took it. I graduated summa cum laude from the University of Michigan.
    By the time I got my Master\'s degree in administrative education, things had changed severely. No longer could an educator speak to a student about behavior problems. You never discussed the